Programs

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  • Community-focused Urban Scholars Program (CUSP): CUSP is a comprehensive approach to diversifying the UW School of Medicine student population and addressing WWAMI’s urban underserved physician workforce shortage through pipeline development and community-based medical school training. The CUSP Scholars engage in a four year, integrated curriculum which offers in depth public health training and clinical experiences in underserved settings. Scholars also grow personally and professionally through mentorship, reflection, and service learning.
  • Concurrent Degree Programs
  • Global Health Immersion Program (GHIP)
  • Pathways​
  • WWAMI TRACK Program: The WWAMI Track program allows for a select group of students to be scheduled for a designated amount of time in one specific state or regional within WWAMI (minimum of 24 weeks for Patient Care Phase and a minimum of 12 weeks for Explore & Focus Phase).  Medical students must participate in an application process for each phase separately, in which students are matched to Track sites.  See site for additional details and Track site locations.
  • Rural Programs:
    • Rural Underserved Opportunities Program (RUOP)
      Between their first and second years, RUOP offers students preceptorships with practicing physicians in rural and underserved clinics across the WWAMI states.
    • Targeted Rural and Underserved Track (TRUST)
      TRUST seeks to provide a continuous connection between underserved communities, medical education, and health professionals in our region. The goal is to create a full-circle pipeline by guiding qualified students through a special curriculum that connects underserved communities in Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho to the UW School of Medicine and its network of affiliated residency programs in an effort to help meet the workforce needs of the region.
    • WWAMI Rural Integrated Training Experience (WRITE)
      The WRITE Program is a longitudinally integrated clerkship developed by the UW School Of Medicine as a means to help medical students learn and understand practicing rural medicine. The success of this unique program is due to the integration of community involvement, continuity of experience, and a proven curriculum. The impetus for creating WRITE was to expand primary care and rural training options at the University of Washington; develop additional training experiences in the WWAMI states, including rural areas; foster the primary care mission of the University of Washington; and provide more physicians for rural practice in the Pacific Northwest.​​
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