Seattle Non-Clinical Elective Courses

Below are the Non-Clinical Electives offered by quarter. Please note that, while students can see the current quarter’s Non-Clinical Electives, there may be updates up until the start of the quarter.

Students must not sign up for Non-Clinical Electives, preceptorships, or shadowing experiences which routinely conflict with classes or required activities (e.g., PCP, hospital tutorials and FCM workshops, required Foundations coursework). Please contact the appropriate Non-Clinical Elective course administrator or faculty for permission to accommodate absence from the elective; students should only reach out if their schedule allows them to attend most of the class times.

As a reminder, these courses are not available for first and second year regional students. Please refer to the WWAMI Non-Clinical Electives Courses (Spokane, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) page for site-specific courses. For questions, please email the SOM Non-Clinical Electives team,

Academic Year 2022-23

More information on the courses can be found by clicking here.


B H 556 Social Justice and Health (5)

Examines the moral grounds for the view that social inequalities in health are unjust, using contemporary literature from moral philosophy and bioethics, case studies, and film. Explores basic questions integral to determinations of social injustice as well as moral constraints on the pursuit of health equity.


B H 562 Ethical Issues in Pediatrics (3)

Provides a survey of contemporary ethical issues that arise in the clinical and research environment when children are involved, including the role of children and adolescents in decision-making, the limits of parental decision-making authority, and issues related to genetic testing, transplantation, research, and public health. Offered: jointly with PEDS 562;


FAMED 516 Team Based Care in Rural/Underserved Settings (1)

An interdisciplinary, non-clinical elective for all health profession students. Fulfills part of the didactic requirements for the AHEC Scholars Program. Prerequisite: CONJ 515.


FAMED 525 African American Health and Health Care Disparity (1)

Examines the most pressing health issues facing African Americans. Provides a forum to examine the root causes of health disparity in African descendants. Explores strategies to remedy problems in public health and healthcare delivery systems. Prerequisite: current graduate health science student; permission of course coordinator. Credit/no-credit only.


FAMED 561 LGBTQ Health and Health Disparities (1)

Covers the history and health status of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, Queer, and Intersex (LGBTQ) community in the United States; effective strategies and skills for working with the LGBTQ community; designed to help the learner understand and respond better to healthcare needs of the LGBTQ community. Prerequisite: permission of course coordinator.


G H 501 Core Topics in Global Health (1)

Examines a variety of foundational global health topics including maternal, adolescent, and child health; nutrition; infectious diseases; environmental health; non-communicable diseases; and mental health. Within each topic area, we will define the problems, complexities, and context, and establish the need for multidisciplinary approaches.


G H 554 Bioengineering Solutions to Improve the Health of Families Worldwide (1/2)

Seminar series that engages students in interdisciplinary discussions about global health. Explores how bioengineering approaches contribute to (1) the study of problems of global health importance, (2) the development of diagnostics, and (3) the discovery of interventional strategies to improve human health. Emphasizes collaboration between students and researchers with backgrounds in infectious disease, basic science, and bioengineering. Credit/no-credit only. Offered: jointly with BIOEN 554;


G H 572 Global Health Fieldwork: Preparation, Integration, Reentry (2)

Prepares students for community-based global health experiences, and provides them the opportunity to share, discuss, and reflect on these experiences after returning to the United States. Explores the problems and promise of current global health strategies. Prerequisite: participation in International Health Opportunities Program or similar experience. Credit/no-credit only.


G H 575 Global Health Leadership for the Clinician (3)

One-month intensive course for clinicians interested in careers in global health. Designed to teach the skills necessary to become future leaders in this field. Comprised of several different components, including field visits to local global health organizations, lectures, and small group case-based discussions. Credit/no-credit only.


G H 576 Health in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies (2)

Covers the principles of planning, implementing, and evaluating health programs for refugees and internally displaced persons during complex humanitarian emergencies in resource poor countries. Topics include rapid assessment; surveys; surveillance; nutrition; camp management; epidemiology of infectious diseases; water and sanitation; and vaccination campaigns during international relief operations for complex humanitarian emergencies. Credit/no-credit only.


G H 590 Selected Topics in Global Health (1-5, max. 15)

Focuses on topics relevant to global health.


MED 503 Cardiac Ultrasound (1)

Instruction will be given in how to 1) acquire cardiac ultrasound images at three acoustic windows, 2) identify cardiac anatomy in standard views, and 3) recognize key pathologies: left and right ventricular dysfunction and dilatation and pericardial effusion. Following a course introduction, students will work self-paced, alone or in pairs, on a mannequin-based simulator. Prerequisite: MED C standing or Undergraduate premedicine students with Senior status. Credit/no-credit only.


MED 549 Clinical Medical Genetics (1, max. 6)

Review of current clinical advances in medical genetics. Includes lectures and discussion of cases from medical genetics clinic. Prerequisite: genetics or human genetics and permission of instructor.


MED 556 Visual Thinking and Medical Diagnosis (1)

Uses visual thinking strategies to look at art and enhance diagnostic acumen. Expands observational and critical thinking skills, and encourages open-ended discussion. Skills applied in assessing patients. Combination of slide sessions and observation of original objects at Seattle museums. Credit/no-credit only.


MED 557 Hispanic Health and Healthcare Disparities (1)

Covers Hispanic culture and language, history of Hispanics in the United States, Hispanic health status issues, and effective strategies for working across cultures and linguistic barriers. Designed to help the learner understand and respond better to the healthcare needs of the Hispanic community. Credit/no-credit only.


MED 569 Addiction Medicine (1)

Themes relevant to treatment of substance-using patients. Designed to build curiosity and increase familiarity with individual and societal factors that impact such patients, including various forms of bias and discrimination. Students develop and practice skills in order to become competent future providers for drug-using patients. Prerequisite: enrollment in graduate health science programs. Credit/no-credit only.


MED 573 Clinical Management of HIV (2)

Provides in-depth case-based training on the diagnosis and clinical management of HIV and associated conditions. Includes interactive format with clinician-educators from the UW Division of Infectious Diseases. Credit/no-credit only.


UCONJ 565 The Healer’s Art: Awakening the Heart of Healthcare (1)

Encourages the cultivation of humanism, meaning, and interprofessional connection in healthcare. Through large and small groups, students co-create community alongside practicing clinician facilitators. Students practice self-reflection, curiosity, and generous listening. Explore themes of wholeness, grief, mystery, service, and courage within healthcare. Prerequisite: enrollment in health science professional training program. Credit/no-credit only.



UCONJ 624 Health Equity and Community Organizing (1)

Equips students with tools to organize themselves and others to address social and structural injustices that perpetuate health disparities. Didactic coursework complemented with opportunities to apply skills and gain confidence through hands-on collaboration with local leaders and engagement in community-driven listening and advocacy campaigns. Credit/no-credit only.


More information on the courses can be found by clicking here.

TBD – everything below here is not current for Winter 2023…. 

This is from a previous Winter Quarter NOT 2023

***COMING SOON***

CONJ 515 A – Introduction to Team Based Care (1) Toby Keys and Genya Shimkin

Provides opportunities for students in health professional programs to learn about inter-professional education, practice transformation, behavioral health integration, social determinants of health, cultural humility, and current emerging healthcare topics that concern rural and urban underserved communities. Addresses demographics, economics, community structure, culture, and professional/personal issues. Add code required.


CONJ 550 A – Clinical Infectious Diseases (3) Paul Pottinger and Seth Cohen

Lecture series by faculty members from various departments, authorities in the field of clinically important infectious diseases. Lectures, reading assignments, and handouts emphasize epidemiology, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Oriented for second-year medical students.


CONJ 570 A – Clinical Management of Transgender Patients (1) Roberta Dalley

Covers the steps and protocols providers need to know to provide culturally proficient care for trans-identified patients. Prior completion of FAMED 561 highly recommended. Prerequisite: current graduate health science student and permission of course coordinator.


FAMED 556 A – Spanish for Healthcare Professionals (1) Nathalia Jimenez and Lorena Wright

Instruction in interviewing/history taking Spanish-speaking patient. Prerequisite: Spanish fluency at intermediate level; current graduate health science student; permission of course coordinator.


G H 502 A – Current Research and Programs in Global Health (1) Christine McGrath

Examines current research and programs in Global Health priority areas with an emphasis on the use of research evidence to inform policy and implementation strategies in programmatic settings. Evidence-based approaches to address key global health issues in maternal, adolescent, and child health, infectious diseases, environmental health, and non-communicable diseases will be evaluated.


G H 543 A/PHARM 581 A – Global Health Pharmacy: Medicine, Practice & Policy (2) Andy Stergachis

Introduces the critical role of pharmaceutical in addressing major diseases (such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis) affecting persons in resource-limited settings. Addresses the wide range of relevant issues, including burden of disease, human resource capacity, regulation, drug safety/pharmacovigilance, drug distribution, pharmacoeconomics, financing, intellectual property, and drug trade policies.


G H 590 A – Global Mental Health Research and Practice (1) Pamela Collins

Global mental health professionals design, study, and implement interventions to support vulnerable populations and to improve the mental health of communities worldwide through education, policy making and research. This course is designed for graduate students exploring research and practice activities focused on mental health in low resource settings. An emphasis of the course will be on helping students to identify and refine their immediate research and practice trajectories.


MED 503 A – Cardiac Ultrasound (1) Florence Sheehan

Instruction will be given in how to 1) acquire cardiac ultrasound images at three acoustic windows, 2) identify cardiac anatomy in standard views, and 3) recognize key pathologies: left and right ventricular dysfunction and dilatation and pericardial effusion. Following a course introduction, students will work self-paced, alone or in pairs, on a mannequin-based simulator. Prerequisite: MED C standing or Undergraduate premedicine students with Senior status.


MED 549 A – Clinical Medical Genetics (1) Paul Valdmanis

Review of current clinical advances in medical genetics. Includes lectures and discussion of cases from medical genetics clinic. Prerequisite: genetics or human genetics and permission of instructor.


MED 555 A – Mind, Body, and Pen: Writing and the Art of Becoming a Physician (1) Emily Transue

Provides forum for medical students to write about issues in medicine and medical education. Focuses on writing as a process for giving voice to the conflicting demands and dilemmas of becoming a physician. Explores personal narratives, dreams and disappointments, chronic illness and death, empathy and revulsion, authenticity and power.


UCONJ 530 A – Issues in Indian Health: Past, Present and Future (2) Jason Deen

Surveys historical and contemporary issues in Indian health. Covers Indian contributions to health, traditional Indian medicine, current disease epidemiology, development of federal Indian health policy, the Indian Health Service, tribal health programs, and consequences of major legislation on Indian health. Prerequisite: current health science student or permission of instructor.


UCONJ 531 B – Introduction to Mind Body Medicine-An Experiential Elective (2) Lisa Erlanger
Sessions contain a didactic component followed by an experiential component and cover a variety of self-care techniques including meditation, exercise, and nutrition. Goals are to promote personal well being, a healthy lifestyle, reduce burnout, and reduce academic difficulties.


UCONJ 550 A – Community Healthcare (1) Jocelyn James

Gives graduate/professional students in health sciences an introduction to health related issues faced by underserved populations.


UCONJ 646 A – Introduction to Advocacy for the Health Professions (1) Genevieve Pagalilauan

Learn from advocacy and topic specific experts about fundamental elements of health advocacy. Develop hands-on skills for moving beyond witnessing health disparities to upstream action rooted in community-centered advocacy.

More information on the courses can be found by clicking here.

TBD – everything below here is not current for Spring 2023…. 

This is from a previous Spring Quarter NOT 2023

***COMING SOON***

FAMED 535 A Medical Chinese Terminology (1) L Zhu and F Heidrich

For healthcare professions students interested in expanding cultural understanding and improving communication with patients whose primary language is Mandarin Chinese. Includes common Mandarin Chinese medical terminology used during medical visits; Chinese culture and beliefs toward health and sickness; and cross-cultural comparison of healthcare delivery in China and the United States. Recommended: Some conversational level Chinese will be helpful and basic training in medical history taking.


FAMED 550 A Critical Race Theory in Medicine (1) Edwin Lindo

Understanding race and racism, their applicability to medicine, and their effects on marginalized communities. Explores the necessities of critiquing and bettering medicine through a Critical Race Theory lens in order to eliminate bias and decrease health disparities within marginalized communities.


G H 561 A / MED 561 A Tropical Medicine (1) Fred Buckner and Seth Cohen

Intended for professional health science students interested in learning the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and clinical presentation of disease conditions that are more commonly seen in less-developed countries, resource-limited settings, or tropical climates, and how to diagnose, treat, and follow the resolution of these diseases with commonly limited resources.


G H 514 B Global Societal Determinants of Health (2) Stephen Bezruchka

Describes the factors that enhance and detract from achieving a healthy population. Details approaches to achieving population health in various countries and global regions. Covers special topics in population health. Students learn what leads to good population health, and how this is achieved around the world.


G H 517 A International Bioethics, Social Justice and Health Seminar (1) Beth Rivin

Explores case studies of ethical dilemmas in research and medical practice and violations of international human rights norms in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health programs and policies. Bioethics and human rights law are the foundational tools for critically evaluating global health impact.


G H 547 A Adolescent Health in Low Resource Settings (1) Keshet Ronen

Highlights issues affecting adolescents in resource limited settings with an initial focus on what makes adolescents unique. Topic-based seminars, journal article discussions, and student-led discussions will include: adolescent development; physical and psychological trauma; illicit activities; ethics and the law; adolescent-focused research and programming; and public policy.


G H 549 A Global Lab Systems (1) Lucy Perrone and Olusegun Soge

Provides an overview of the role of clinical and public health laboratories in a national public health system, both in US and globally. Covers the functional components of a laboratory system and the importance of quality laboratory information on public health policy making. Topics include disease diagnosis, surveillance, outbreak response, law and regulation and how laboratory information contributes to health policy development.


G H 590 A Global Biosecurity and Pandemic Preparedness (1) Jason Beste

The overall objective of this seminar course is to provide an introduction and realistic appreciation for the field of Global Biosecurity and Pandemic Preparedness. The course will introduce students to the most up to date concepts and topics in global biosecurity and pandemic preparedness including emerging infectious disease of pandemic potential, zoonotic diseases, One Health, vaccines, effects of climate change on pandemic preparedness, vulnerability assessments and forecasting, laboratory medicine, medical countermeasures, risk communication, and careers in Biosecurity and Pandemic Preparedness.


G H 590 B Cost-Effectiveness Analysis for Global Health Research (1) Monisha Sharma

Covers role of economic evaluation in informing global health policies, including process of incorporating an economic evaluation alongside a clinical or implementation trial; identifying steps of conducting an economic evaluation including project conceptualization, microcosting, modeling of health outcomes, and calculation of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios; and rationale behind the use of disability-adjusted life years and cost-effectiveness thresholds in resource limited settings.


G H 590 C Principles of Costing for Global Health (1) Carol Levin

This methods course will explore the principles, fundamental concepts, application and design of cost data collection and analyses used in cost analyses, economic evaluations and budget impact for implementing and scaling interventions in low and middle income settings.  Students will become familiar with various objectives and uses of cost data in global health settings and learn the appropriate and specific methods and approaches to collect and analyze cost data to meet global health research applications


MED 503 A Cardiac Ultrasound (1) Florence Sheehan

Instruction will be given in how to 1) acquire cardiac ultrasound images at three acoustic windows, 2) identify cardiac anatomy in standard views, and 3) recognize key pathologies: left and right ventricular dysfunction and dilatation and pericardial effusion. Following a course introduction, students will work self-paced, alone or in pairs, on a mannequin-based simulator. Prerequisite: MED C standing or Undergraduate premedicine students with Senior status.


MED 549 A Clinical Medical Genetics (1) Elizabeth Blue and Paul Valdmanis

Review of current clinical advances in medical genetics. Includes lectures and discussion of cases from medical genetics clinic. Prerequisite: genetics or human genetics and permission of instructor.


PEDS 513 A Scientific Investigation in Pediatric Medicine (1) Lisa Mave and Benjamin Aaronson

Faculty Investigators in the Department of Pediatrics will lecture on the general biology of their research area and its relevance to understanding pediatric disease and developing therapies. Given the varied nature of research represented in the Department of Pediatrics, the course will be wide-ranging and include basic science and clinical/translational approaches. Each participating investigator will give one 1-hour presentation.